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Abdominal fat-reducing outcome of exercise training: Fat burning versus hydrocarbon source redistribution?

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 1,237)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
49 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
Title
Abdominal fat-reducing outcome of exercise training: Fat burning versus hydrocarbon source redistribution?
Published in
Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, March 2016
DOI 10.1139/cjpp-2015-0425
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chia-Hua Kuo, Brennan M Harris, Kuo, Chia-Hua, Harris, M Brennan, M. Brennan Harris, Chia-Hua Kuo, M. Brennan Harris

Abstract

Fat burning, defined by fatty acid oxidation into carbon dioxide, is the most described hypothesis to explain the actual abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise training. This hypothesis is strengthened by evidence of increased whole-body lipolysis during exercise. As a result, aerobic training is widely recommended for obesity management. This intuition raises several paradoxes: first, both aerobic and resistance exercise training do not actually elevate 24 h fat oxidation, according to data from chamber-based indirect calorimetry. Second, anaerobic high-intensity intermittent training produces greater abdominal fat reduction than continuous aerobic training at similar amounts of energy expenditure. Third, significant body fat reduction in athletes occurs when oxygen supply decreases to inhibit fat burning during altitude-induced hypoxia exposure at the same training volume. Lack of oxygen increases post-meal blood distribution to human skeletal muscle, suggesting that shifting the postprandial hydrocarbons towards skeletal muscle away from adipose tissue might be more important than fat burning in decreasing abdominal fat. Creating a negative energy balance in fat cells due to competition of skeletal muscle for circulating hydrocarbon sources may be a better model to explain the abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise than the fat-burning model.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Unknown 14 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 10 21%
Sports and Recreations 10 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2018.
All research outputs
#237,050
of 12,099,480 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
#5
of 1,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,462
of 289,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
#1
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,099,480 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,237 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.